10 Tips to Crafting Your Own Community Project

A Garden in Winter Hat Donation - Hi, Jenny Brown

I consider myself lucky to have the time and yarn to contribute to amazing yarn installations, charity events, and awareness campaigns across the country.  If you’re like me, you totally idolize the folks with enough organization and know-how to put these events together.

But I have a secret – you can do it, too, and you don’t need a ton of money or a huge network of friends or even an original idea.  All you need are these 10 tips based on the experiences of real event organizer and all-around inspiring folks.  But don’t take my word for it…

A Garden in Winter - courtesy Val Dale on hijennybrown.com
Courtesy Val Dale

 

1: IDENTIFY A NEED (OR JUST A WANT)

If no ideas come immediately to mind, scroll through your Facebook feed, roam down Main Street, or talk to friends about the needs of your community (and yes, beautification and public art are needs).  Think about your specific talents and how that could help people in your community – just passing along the knowledge you have is enough.

Still haven’t come up with something? Right now I’m going through New Tech City’s Bored and Beautiful Project, which features 5 challenges in small audio snippets to help you put down your phone and turn on your boredom, and eventually, your great ideas.

2: SHARE YOUR IDEA

You’ve got an idea, but you’re not completely sure how to implement it.  And deep down, there’s some nagging part of you that worries it’s not even a good idea.  That’s OK – share it anyway!

Sarah & Ella - courtesy Sarah Worth on HiJennyBrown.com
Courtesy Sarah Wirth

 

You may have seen yarnbombers attaching scarves to statues and trees as a gift to those who are cold or homeless.  Sarah Wirth (an old high school buddy – Hi, Sarah!) shared one such picture on Frederick’s Student Homelessness Initiative Partnership Facebook feed, which caught the eye of SHIP’s founder, Ed Hinde, and Val Dale, who offered to start a Facebook event page.  The freezing temperatures in January encouraged them to act quickly, so they encouraged folks to collect new and gently used scarves, hats, gloves, and jackets to be distributed the next week. Val worried that the event might not have enough time to go viral with such a tight timeline: “I expected 40 to 50 to attend, with maybe a couple hundred invites.  Instead, it truly caught on fire…I think the idea just really resonated with folks. It was something they could do that would make a first-hand impact.  It was visual in its symbolism.  There has been a lot of focus on poverty and homelessness in our community.  It gave folks something tangible they could do together.”

A Garden in Winter Hat Donation - Hi, Jenny Brown

It was so successful, in fact, that organizers started to worry there would be too many people and donations.  Luckily, the Rescue Mission offered a truck to collect more donations, participants identified additional locations for leaving donations in advance, and a local police officer monitored traffic.

3: DON’T WAIT FOR SOMEONE ELSE TO DO IT

It sounds cliché, but no one has your same unique mix of experience, talent, and connections.  As Stacey Monique would tell you: Why Not You?’

knit hat - HiJennyBrown.com

If you need more convincing, Emily’s Hats for Hope Initiative, which has distributed over 15,000 hats to people who needed them, was started by a then 17-year-old.  I think you can do it.

4: GET OVER YOURSELF AND ASK

There might be a little part of you that thinks you’re not cool or popular enough to pull this off, but friendo, this ain’t high school.  The only difference between you and the fancy event organizers you see on the news is that they actually asked for help.  That, and they have way more expensive nail polish.

I’ve contributed to a few yarnbombing projects lately that I learned about on Instagram, of all places.  They make it easy by spelling out specifically what they want, where it should be sent, and how it will be used.  I think Yarnbomber is probably the best example of this: he announces his projects using one of his many beautiful scenic photos, gives a firm deadline, and let’s people be creative.  He also lets folks know that their items may not be used at all, which helps manage everyone’s expectations while also adding an exciting air of mystery.  When I saw my square in his latest installation, I was ecstatic!.

It also doesn’t have to be a “thing.” Ask a fellow blogger to share your event.  Ask your English snob buddy to read over your invitation.  Ask your local craft store to put event fliers in every bag.  The worst they can say is no.

If you’re still a little scared to ask, practice on me.   I promise to say yes.

5. GIVE PEOPLE MULTIPLE WAYS TO HELP

The most successful events allow people to contribute in a way that’s easiest or most rewarding for them.  For the A Garden in Winter event, people could contribute by buying new warm weather accessories, donating gently used items, or making their own (which is of course what I did).  Folks could also come to the kick-off event and tie donated items, or they could just offer support on the event page.

A Garden in Winter Hat Donation - Hi, Jenny Brown

With Knit the Bridge, the largest yarn bomb in the world, You could make a piece or a full panel, you could sew panels on during the installation, you could zip tie machine-knit panels to snow fencing, help direct a crane, donate cash, buy t-shirts, or help tear the thing apart.  Really, there were no bad options (and Craft Husband and I did quite a few).

craft husband on knit the bridge - hijennybrown.com

6. RECOGNIZE YOUR VOLUNTEERS

This is your chance to be the mushy, enthusiastic person that usually only comes out when you catch “The Princess Bride” on cable (still at the Wesley part? Awesome!).  Whenever you can, post about donations coming in, or include stories about the folks you intend to serve on any social media stream available to you.  I was so excited to see the picture NaomiRAG posted when she received my crochet crocuses for her upcoming installation (I am so looking forward about that one!) And don’t forget to check volunteers’ feeds and like the heck out of their posts (not just the ones about you).

Crochet Crocus for NaomiRAG by Hi Jenny Brown

Don’t forget to tell them thank you in person, and don’t worry about throwing in a few extra exclamation points here and there! Also drop the names of any government officials, organizations, or businesses that helped you into press releases, blog posts, or tweets.  Don’t be spammy, but it’s OK to be sincerely grateful.

7. BE SENSITIVE

Some projects, like A Garden in Winter, may require a little more forethought and sensitivity on your part.  Sometimes folks get so wrapped up in the “good” they’re doing that they forget about the end recipient.  Leading up to the event, the A Garden in Winter organizers posted in their Facebook group that participants should treat what some would call encampments as the “homes and neighborhoods” of residents who are homeless. As Val said, “Homelessness is a condition, not a person.”

Contact organizations who also help the people you are planning your project for, and ask them about the language they would use.  They might also be able to review invitations or press releases for you or help identify how best to help a variety of populations.

8. FIGHT THE URGE TO SAY IT’S NOT ENOUGH

No one’s saying you have to solve all the world’s problems with your first event.  When the Young Preservationists decided to decorate abandoned or at risk historic building in downtown Wheeling, my group jumped at the chance to decorate a beautiful Victorian building.  The event and decorations caught the eye of Glenn Elliott, who had recently moved back to Wheeling and couldn’t resist the vacant building.  A couple hearts downtown didn’t save an entire town, but it did save one building and helped a man move from advocate to owner. (Why is this not a romantic comedy yet?  Lifetime Channel, are you listening?)

Heart Party - hijennybrown

Oh gosh, I miss these guys.  We were so glad the Professional Building had a new owner that we went back a year later to give her a little more love.

2-9-2014 Professional Building Hearts-9855

Knitteapolis recently got permission to yarnbomb the Mall of America sign in red panels & hearts for Wear Red Day with the goal of raising awareness about heart disease in women.  The final result was so pretty, MoA allowed it to stay up longer and pictures and videos of the event were EVERYWHERE I looked that day.

I’ve seen people afraid to volunteer to organize or participate in events because they’re not “doing enough.” As Val said, even events that have a direct benefit, like providing warm clothing or food, can have a bigger effect: “I think whenever we engage the community, it raises awareness.  News coverage, which there was, reaches an even broader audience. You want the word out in as many venues as possible.  While the news covered it after the event happened, I do think that people who saw it would then consider the topic and what they might do to be involved in the issue.  It would be my hope that it will increase participation.”

9. PLAN THE NEXT STEP

Once your successful campaign or project is over, you’re going to be on the highest high…and you want to capitalize on that before you lose momentum.

Hi, Jenny Brown Flowers for Pop des Fleurs

Knit the Bridge has Pop des Fleurs, A Garden in Winter is using their event page to discuss other actions they can take, and everyone’s favorite giver of crochet hearts, Nallie Radloff, is adding some wood love.  Don’t wait until it’s over to think about what’s next because you want to feel like this forever.

10. Now Just Do It!

I can’t say it any better than Val did: “We can all think of 15 reasons why something won’t work.  Instead, think of HOW it will work and then ‘just do it!'”
BONUS TIP: Make friends with a good photographer!  Thanks to Erin Markan of @fcollected for her great photos of all our projects over the years (and happy early birthday, friendo!)
Bye,
Jenny Brown

How to buy your first crochet hook

hook and heart - hijennybrown

No one every told me how to buy crochet hooks, so I took the same approach I’ve perfected in the ice cream aisle – buy everything that appeals to me. I’ve bought some real duds and made some lucky discoveries, but I would have saved a lot of money and indecision if I had known what to get before I got there. So don’t do what I did – just follow this infographic on how to buy your first crochet hook.

Click the image below to view or download a PDF that you can zoom in on and study before your trip to the craft store.  Of course, if you have any questions, just search for @hijennybrown on your favorite social media platform and drop me a line.

how to buy your first crochet hook - hijennybrown.com

 

While you’re at it, also check out the Hi, Jenny Brown guide to Buying Your First Ball of Yarn.

Bye,
Jenny Brown

Crochet Heart Garland

candy and sweet crochet heart garland - hijennybrown.com

candy and sweet crochet heart garland - hijennybrown.comI’m a big fan of Twinkie Chan’s blog and patterns.  If the name doesn’t ring a bell, I’m sure you’ve seen her food-inspired crochet items featured in numerous magazines, books, and websites. She recently released a video tutorial for a conversation heart crochet garland, and I knew I had to make one.

make a personalized crochet heart garland - hijennybrown.comWhile she used cut-out felt to add a message to her crochet hearts, I thought I’d step it up a notch and use crocheted letters.  You can find Twinkie’s video tutorial here, and written pattern here.

Make a Heart Garland with Lion Brand BonBons - hijennybrown.comShe used worsted weight yarn, but I thought this project was a great opportunity to use up my stockpile of Lion Brand Bonbons for a smaller crochet heart garland.  I made a few hearts from the glitter set, but the bright, solid color acrylic yarn is a little thicker and better mimics the colors of conversation hearts. I used a “D” hook to crochet the hearts.

personalize a crochet heart garland - hijennybrown.com

You can add the letters before or after adding the string for hanging (I used a “D” hook and thin, “soft” worsted yarn for the string.  You have to crochet pretty tight, but the resulting string is strong and looks great with the small hearts).

Sweet personalized crochet heart garland - hijennybrown.com

Lowercase letters fit best on these tiny hearts. I used crochet thread and a 1.65 mm (7) hook to make the letters.  Because I was using thin, vintage thread (gotta work that stash), I double-stranded, but I also tried it with #10 crochet thread and it fit perfectly.

Add crochet characters to other pieces - HiJennyBrown.comPin your letters into place and then using a yarn needle and the running stitch, fasten character to heart. Then just weave in the ends. For this worsted weight heart, you can use anything from crochet thread to a sport weight or DK weight yarn (here, I used leftover Bonbons yarn on a cotton-acrylic worsted weight heart).  If you’re worried about the back, you can always crochet a second heart and join together, wrong sides facing.

sweet heart crochet garland - hijennybrown.com

And there you go – a very sweet Valentine’s Day decoration!

Bye,
Jenny Brown

PS – OK, one more sweetheart for you:

 

Sweet Heart - photo by Erin Markan on hijennybrown.com
Photos by Erin Markan – Thanks, Erin!

Personalized Crochet Coffee Sleeve

J Coffee Cup Sleeve - HiJennyBrown

One of the great things about going to Michelle Ward’s Creative Live class (besides eating my weight in vegetarian tacos) was meeting some amazing people, including Jen of Jen & Company. Hi, Jen!

Jen asked if I would make her a crochet coffee sleeve and pinned this pattern.  If you watched the class, you know she looks amazing in coral, so this one (recognize the yarn?) should go well with her outfits.

Crochet Coffee Sleeve - HiJennyBrown

That texture is just the best.

Crochet Cup Sleeve - HiJennyBrown

Of course, I couldn’t just make one.  I also made a purple one (recognize that yarn?) with her name in lilac.

Jen Crochet Coffee Sleeve - HiJennyBrown

It was so hard to pack it up – I mean, I’m a Jen…and it felt so good in my hand…and that vintage button…

Crochet Coffee Cup Sleeve - HiJennyBrown

But I packed it up anyway.  I can always make more, right?

Jen Crochet Coffee Cuff - HiJennyBrown

If you’d like to make one, just take your favorite coffee sleeve pattern and crochet up a few letters (if you’re crocheting a long name or word, use crochet thread so you can fit more characters). Pin the letters to the cuff (be sure to leave room for the button) and place it on a dummy cup.  This will ensure the cuff won’t be too tight with your sewn letters.  Then all you need to do is attach them with the running stitches and you’re done.  (If you’re worried about how the wrong side will look, you can add a piece of felt to the back.  But really, nobody is going to look).

J Coffee Cup Sleeve - HiJennyBrown

I hope Jen likes them, and I also hope we’ll have coffee in the same state again, soon.

Bye,
Jenny Brown

 

Photos by Erin Markan of Folks Collected.  Thanks, Erin!

Flower Lady

Crochet Crocus - Hi, Jenny Brown

I know you don’t want to hear me talk about how cold I am.  Is it interesting at all that I’m wearing a hat and cowl inside, with the tiny electric heater blowing on my feet?  Wanna chat about my ultra-dry skin or über-frizzy hair? Were you wondering if I’ve been googling water-heated mattress pads all night? No, not at all?  Then let’s just skip to the part where I’m so hungry for spring that I’m crocheting nothing but flowers until NJ thaws out.

Crochet Crocus for NaomiRAG by Hi Jenny Brown

My first flower foray came from this instagram post by amazing yarn artist @NaomiRAG. Have you seen her amazing crochet yarnbombing before?

Do I want to contribute?  Uh, yeah! A quick email later, I had the pattern in hand and was working up some crocuses (crocqui?).  Erin had a whole vision for flower pictures: I got out the double-stick tape, and she started drawing stems on her repurposed whiteboard-turned-chalkboard.  (True fact: I have been voted “Least Likely to Keep a Plant Alive” and I didn’t know crocuses grew on stems.  She started talking about how they were the first flower of spring, and I suddenly realized she had a better handle on this project than I ever did. Oh, Erin, why you always got to be better and smarter?)

Mr. A adding leaves to crochet crocuses - Hi Jenny Brown

Mr. A (who is an excellent graffiti student), was really keen on drawing some leaves.

Mr. A adding sky to crochet crocuses - Hi Jenny Brown

He and his mom did a little additional decorating as well, and I really love how the pictures turned out.

Crochet Crocus on chalkboard - Hi Jenny Brown

My goodness, it was hard to take these down and ship them out…

Crochet Crocus - Hi, Jenny BrownBut, on to the next project.
Crochet Daisy - Hi, Jenny Brown

The folks behind Knit the Bridge have a new project – Pop des Fleurs. This flower-based installation in 2016 will feature tons of handmade flowers, but they are in need of various flower types for a test installation next month.  I made some of the plastic bag flowers they suggested (I just subbed crochet for knitting), but I was not feeling the plarn this week.

Crochet Daisy - Hi, Jenny BrownSo I moved on to some bulky acrylic flowers based on this pattern by Saria with some leftover Lion Brand Hometown.  I was digging the big bright flowers so much that I kinda wanted to leave them on that (cold, cold, cold) fence so I could visit them every once in a while.

Crochet Daisy - Hi, Jenny Brown

(The stems here are sad, dead vines from summer.  Oh winter, you’re the meanest).

Crochet Daisy - Hi, Jenny Brown

If you know of any other yarnbombing or crochet/knit installation projects, or you’ve participated in one yourself, please let me know about it in the comments.  I need a few more things to keep my hands busy to keep them from freezing solid.

Bye,
Jenny Brown

photo kiddo - hijennybrown

PS – I gave the boys my camera while their mom was taking pictures, and I sent a little behind-the-scenes peek at the cuteness to the folks on my weekly email list.  Want to learn more about HiJB and hear about new patterns and products before anyone else?  Well then sign up, friendo!

PPS – Today is my mom’s birthday!   Happy Birthday, Mom!

Buying Your First Ball of Yarn

Buying Your First Ball - hijennybrown.com

Last week I was roaming around my local chain craft store when I overheard two ladies begging a clerk to help them figure out what and how much yarn to buy for a pattern they had brought along.  Unfortunately he didn’t know, but fortunately, I will butt into ANY conversation.  A few minutes later we were doing some quick calculations to determine what needles to buy and how many skeins to throw in the cart. This isn’t the first time that’s happened, and I think it’s only fair to take some time this year to share my yarn, hook, and pattern info with you.  This week we investigate the best yarn to buy for a variety of projects.  This graphic is perfect for beginners who are ready to buy their very first ball of yarn but are feeling so very overwhelmed.  Click the image below to view or download a PDF that you can zoom in on and study before your trip to the yarn store.  Of course, if you have any questions, just drop search for @hijennybrown on your favorite social media platform and drop me a line.

Buying Your First Ball of Yarn - Hi, Jenny Brown

Bye,
Jenny Brown

2014: A Little Too Good

Professional Building Hearts-HiJennyBrown

2015, I don’t want to give you a complex or anything, but you’re going to have a lot to live up to cause 2014 kinda killed it.  I mean, seriously:

I casually talked to some famous people

Judge John Hodgman Show - via maximumfun.org Jenny - Creative Live with Michelle Ward

No bigs, just John Hodgman & Jesse Thorn on the Judge John Hodgman Podcast and Michelle Ward during her Creative Live class in San Francisco (I also met Creative Live fan-girl favorite JKO, FYI).

Hi, Jenny Brown won an award for crochet photography (thanks to our amazing photographer Erin Markan) from Crochet Concupiscence. Thanks, Kathryn!

awesome blog award - crochet concupiscence

Our crew moved to New Jersey and have yet to get a spray tan (or meet a person with one, btw) and enjoyed being just a train ride away from NYC.

Etsy Craft Party - Hi, Jenny Brown

I released a New Pattern: Crochet Bannerama

Crochet Bannerama by Hi, Jenny Brown- 3 Pattern Multipack for crochet garland, banner, and bunting that you can personalize

and two free crochet project that use my letter, number, & punctuation patterns:

Teacher Gift Crochet Cup Cuff Project PatternLast Day First Day Back to School Crochet Reversible Photo Prop

One of my yarn bombs survived in the wild for 3 months (confirmed by Richelle of the Red Scorpio in November and by Jenna of Promo Analyzer in mid-December) and counting

hello yarnbomb front hi jenny brownrepost of redscorpios photo on hijennybrown.com

Hello Yarn Bomb - picture by Jenna of promoanalyzer.com

and I made a couple other cool yarnbombs (with help from Erin & Craft Husband).

Stop Collaborate & Listen yarnbombyarn bomb - barber pole crochet yarnbomb

and a giant heart with the folks of Ohio Valley Handmade

Professional Building Hearts-HiJennyBrown
All We Need Is Love - Yarnbomb

I kinda killed it with school crafts

lego necklace - hijennybrown.com 10-30-2014, Trunk or Treat, Minecraft Car - hijennybrown.com

 

I gave some pretty good advice

You Know What You Should Make - Hi, Jenny Brown

 

10 tips to help kids love crochet - Hi, Jenny BrownI had so much fun with Hooking for Good: donating 9 items to organizations throughout the country, donating $1 from every sale to Action Against Hunger, and giving away amazing items by Kari Chapin, Ann Espo of OpportuKnits, artist and podcaster Heather Saulsbury, and Adri of Moon Star Adri to you awesome folks.

Hooking for Good Crochet and Knit Donations - hijennybrown.com

And I LOVED seeing your FOs made with my motif patterns and project ideas!

A photo posted by Jacqui J (@yarnosaurusrex) on

 

Plus, I was humble all year long.

I also met so many amazing makers, artists, crocheters,  coaches, and enthusiasts this year, and I want to thank you all for your kindness and support.  Please forgive me for not mentioning you individually because inevitably I will leave out the most sensitive person, and I don’t want anyone to feel bad on the New Year’s!

See you next year,
Jenny Brown

Hooking for Good – The Wrap-Up Show

Hooking for Good Crochet and Knit Donations - hijennybrown.com

Hooking for Good Crochet and Knit Donations - hijennybrown.com

It’s the season of giving, and I used my crochet hook and a few other crafty weapons to to give back a little beginning this November. So how did we celebrate Hooking for Good?

Handmade Donations: I love donating handmade items, so I made one (almost) every week. Each project was so easy that you can do it to!

My donations:

Hi, Jenny Brown - scarves for craft hope

plastic crochet mat - trial - hijennybrown.com

  • 1 blanket to our local animal shelter

crochet blanket - hijennybrown

pompomcloseup - hijennybrown.com

Knit Hat - HiJennyBrown.com

Hi, Jenny Brown - knit mittens for donation

Hi, Jenny Brown - crochet ripple blanket for Binky Patrol

Giveaways: You’ve been good all year and deserve a little something! I gave away a handmade item, book, or pattern each Tuesday through Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. Items were donated by artist Heather Saulsbury of Creatively Happy, author Kari Chapin, knitter Ann Espo of OpportuKnits, and jewelry designer Adri Westlake of Moon Star Adri.

Week 6 Giveaway – The book Feltlicious donated by Kari Chapin won by Michaela! Congrats, Micheala!

congrats

Week 5 GiveawayCrochet Bannerama Superpack by Hi, Jenny Brown won by Brandy! Congrats, Brandy!

Our giveaway winner - Brandy

Week 4 Giveaway – Armwarmers by Ann Espo of OpportuKnits won by Melissa W. Congrats, Melissa!

winner - hijennybrown.com

Week 3 Giveaway – A Step Back in Time digital package by artist and podcaster Heather Saulsbury won by Carina. Congrats, Carina!

Congrats, Carina-hijennybrown.com
Week 2 Giveaway – Earrings by Adri of Moon Star Adri won by Sarah W. Congrats, Sarah!

congrats, Sarah - earrings by Moon Star Adri

Week 1 Giveaway – Crochet Cowl by Hi, Jenny Brown (that’s me!) won by Kelly K. Congrats, Kelly!Congrats, Kelly!

Monetary Donations: I promised to donate $1 for every item I sold on Etsy, Ravelry, and Craftsy to Action Against Hunger, an organization that provides nutrition assistance, clean water, and emergency services around the world. I’ve already sent $51 and will make another payment on Dec. 31. Thank you to everyone who made this contribution possible!

This project has been absolutely amazing for me, and I’m so glad I had the opportunity to make and donate all these things! Thank you again to everyone who donated something for our giveaways; to my favorite award-winning photographer Erin Markan for helping with logistics, photos, and ideas; to Craft Husband who donated the postage and hours in the Post Office line to send out prizes and donations, and to all of you who commented, made items, or shared a kind word. I really appreciate you all!

Bye,
Jenny Brown

 

Hooking for Good – Blanket Statement

Hi, Jenny Brown - ripple blanket

Oh my goodness! I don’t know whether to jump for joy or fall into a puddle of tears…but this is the last donation for this season’s “Hooking for Good.”

Hi, Jenny Brown - crochet ripple blanket for Binky Patrol

I should admit I’m a little addicted to ripple patterns.  I snuggle every night under a ripple my mom made me long ago, and it’s my fall-back when I need to crochet a blanket fast (or in the case of this thin-worsted, very slowly).  It’s not just that zig-zag pattern or the fun math that makes each row rise and fall. I think it’s also the word “ripple”: not only fun to say, but  a wonderful idea of making a small action that can result in far-reaching waves. You know, like donating something you made for some who needs it.

Crochet Ripple Blanket for Binky Patrol - Hi, Jenny Brown

This blanket is going to Binky Patrol – an organization that distributes blankets to children “born HIV+, drug-addicted, infected with AIDS or other chronic & terminal illnesses, those who are abused, in foster care or experiencing trauma of any kind.”  For those who aren’t crafters, they offer an easy no-sew blanket tutorial on their home page. I also love their idea of getting a group of friends together to help each other make blankets.  If you live near Northern New Jersey or NYC and want to do this, please comment and we will make it happen!

If you’d like to crochet or knit a blanket for another organization, you can find a great list of charities that will distribute them in this post by Starting Chain or this one by Crochet Concupiscence.

Hi, Jenny Brown - crochet ripple blanket for Binky Patrol

I should also say sorry to Mr. A and the Babes.  Both of them really bonded with this blanket, and I loved that they would snuggle under it as I worked each row.  They’ve both been very understanding about the fact that I’ve been donating almost everything I’ve made in the past few months, but they weren’t excited about letting this one go.  Both asked for me to give him the blanket, but A specifically asked that I make another with the same yarn (Heartland by Lion Brand, if you also have a yarn-snob 5-year-old at home & are allergic to wool). Maybe this thing isn’t over after all.

Bye,
Jenny Brown

Hooking for Good – Mail Bag Edition

We Are Kenya - Thank You

I’ve been scrambling a bit to finish my last project for Hooking for Good – due partially to the holidays, partially some wonderful out of town visiting with the in-laws, and partially to my never-ending to-do list.  Just thinking about it is giving me anxiety.

Luckily, these late nights are a little easier after checking the ol’ mailbox.  It’s been full of some pretty heartwarming Hooking for Good happiness.  If you’re looking for an excuse to start donating your handmade items, I can say the mail makes it totally worthwhile.

First, I got a letter from Youth Services in Wheeling, which is the current home of the plastic mat I made.  I was so touched that they took the time to write me a letter, including the story of one of the residents and a picture of the mat in action (it will be given away when the shelter closes for the season in March).

Youth Services shelter - hijennybrown.com

Youth Services shelter - hijennybrown.com

Wheeling Youth Services Letter about crochet plastic mat- hijennybrown.comI also got a postcard from We Are Kenya – I love that they used the word “cozy” to describe the scarves my mom and I made.  So sweet!

We Are Kenya - Thank You

we are kenya back

And I already got a postcard from Emily’s Hats for Hope thanking me for the hat I made and Mr. A modeled.  I’m so glad she liked Alexander’s drawing (he drew a sweet top hat on the envelope).

emily's hats for hope thank you - hijennybrown.comI’ve just got a few more ends to tuck in before I settle down for a long winter’s nap.   Hope y’all are having a wonderful holiday surrounded by people you love!

Bye,
Jenny Brown

PS – Yesterday was out last giveaway, and it was a book by the awesome author, podcaster, and fancy business lady Kari Chapin.  Our winner is Michaela!  Congrats!

congrats